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HomeFeatured ArticlesTHE "GREEN" ceramic tile

THE “GREEN” ceramic tile

Art of Eco is the brainchild of Julie and Paul Langston, a husband-and-wife team that’s been involved in the manufacture of ceramic tile since the start of their careers, having both studied Industrial Ceramics and Illustration. Their journey begun with the creation of a large production facility in North London, producing hand-painted ceramic tile, and sanitaryware.

With over 30 employees, they created collections for many of the outlets at the time and carried out various project work for interior designers. They specialised in large scale murals, and specialist tile ranges, all hand painted and produced using traditional industrial ceramic techniques.

Art of Eco says its name came about from the idea of using art to create and promote something eco. The company endeavours to improve the environment with a long-term sustainable alternative to their and others’ ceramic tile products. Paul and Julie’s view is that, via good design, colour, pattern & picture, the art – the sustainability and eco side of their business venture could be presented in such a way that it would not require a cultural change to adopt. The products should be like for like, with no having to accept less, providing a genuine alternative to traditional ceramic tiles, but with the best eco-friendly credentials.


In recent years, the manufacture of ceramic tile has changed dramatically. The size and the adoption of high definition digital printing techniques has led to vast increases in the size of the product, the company says, as well as an abundance of design variation. The intensive use of fossil fuels and minerals by this industry, however, has had a massive impact on the planet. Art of Eco understands this, and by using recycled stone and aggregates, as well as embracing technologies to do away with heat involved in the manufacturing/production processes, while adopting a zero waste production policy, the company aims to achieve a minimal carbon footprint. It also uses what it describes as the most carbon neutral packaging and distribution methods currently available.


Now the company is set to roll out a range of modular wall and floor tiles, currently based around a 400x400mm base tile, but available in sizes up to 2000x800mm, all at 15mm thick. The large format hand-made slabs are designed to “encompass the uniqueness of the artisan look, but with a technical chic look demanded by today’s consumer”. “They use a stunning pallet of colours, and a ‘drawing’ style that really does make any pattern or picture look like it’s been hand drawn onto your wall,” the company says. “It’s definitely ‘art of eco’ and becomes more of a work of art, rather than simply tiled walls!”


The range is designed to offer the designer or customer more scope in the proportions of tile to be used in relation to the space available, or using coloured pieces to offset against one another to create scale and effects by using the variation in the tile formats.


All their wall tiles are available in a matte or gloss finish. Floors are matte only, and the company also offers a non-slip coating for wet areas. Owing to the company’s manufacturing techniques, each tile shows a different natural patina, no two are alike. The company also offers a range of kitchen splashbacks available in many widths and heights, and complementary upstands. These are also available in gloss and matte finishes.


Tabletops in both gloss and matte finish are another use of their Ecoslabtone material and offer ways of carrying your chosen design theme through onto other surfaces.


As Art of Eco increases its manufacturing capability, other size tile ranges and further additions are planned for its portfolio, and other products will come online. The company says its future is based on sustainability, function, and the beauty of decoration.
enquiries@artofeco.co.uk

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