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2,000 residential buildings still have dangerous cladding three years after Grenfell

June 2020

There are still 2,000 residential buildings with dangerous cladding, despite three years having elapsed since the Grenfell Tower fire.  In response, theHousing, Communities and Local GovernmentSelect Committee(HCLG committee) has called on the Government to make an absolute commitment to ensure that all tall buildings with ACM cladding are fully remediated of all fire safety defects by December 2021.

The committee says planned Government support will fall far short of what is needed to carry out remedial work on all buildings that currently have dangerous cladding and other fire safety issues, including inadequate fire doors or missing fire breaks.

The £1bn Building Safety Fund to remove combustible non-ACM cladding from buildings above 18 metres is “likely to only be sufficient to cover the cost of removal from a third of the 1,700 buildings needing remediation”.

The committee says that the Government “must accept that the £1bn pledged so far will be insufficient and be prepared to meet the cost of what will be necessary to make sure buildings are safe”.  It added: “Residents cannot be expected to go on meeting the exorbitant costs of temporary fire safety measures while they wait for work to be completed. The Government should provide funding support for ongoing ‘waking watch’ fire patrols and fire alarms.”

Chair of the HCLG committee, Clive Betts, said: “We have challenged the Government to finally commit to removing all forms of dangerous cladding once and for all. Three years on from the Grenfell Tower disaster there are still thousands of home owners living in buildings with some form of dangerous cladding.  The financial and emotional toll has been significant, with temporary safety measures costing huge sums and the ongoing stress of living in a property that may not be safe. This is not good enough.”

“This should not just be a question of the Government, and therefore the taxpayer, stepping in with a blank cheque.  Those who have caused, and in some cases refuse to rectify, safety issues must be made to pay.”  Betts concluded: “It is time for the Government to commit to end the scourge of dangerous cladding once and for all.

 

Source: Building Control News

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